A few thoughts as you start or continue your business

Business continuity

How does your company deal with Business Continuity? Business continuity planning is almost always a difficult endeavor, but it doesn’t have to be expensive. Business continuity planning for small businesses sometimes feels even more difficult.  Before discounting the idea of planning for disaster, realize that sometimes changing small practices can make significant impacts on continuing your business during adverse situations. In the case of one of our Home Health Agency customers, the strategy is to put as much computing power “in the cloud” as quickly as possible, reducing our Recovery Time Objective to near zero.

Physical security

Physical security is more than just a lock on the door or a guard at the gate.  Many times the first consideration is cameras — the thought is that if we deploy a large network of cameras, then our site will be physically secure.  But truly, when it comes to security solutions deployment, cameras (or at least cameras alone) are simply not the best practice.

Cameras and photo evidence

Cameras are great for forensic analysis, that is, to catch a thief. But as many law enforcement agents will advise, cameras don’t do much to stop a thief.

What is better?  In the case of a Time Share Community customer, the community was being hit by midnight bandits stealing items off of boats.  In this community, a two fold solution was employed:  (1) Motion (passive Infrared) lighting throughout the community and (2) reducing the access and availability to the protected area through easily designed terraine chokepoints.

In this case, the protected area was specifically a boat trailer lot, adjoining ramp, and marina slip area. Reducing access involved creating a single entry point with natural artifacts like large rocks surrounding the area. Restricting access with a keyed gate was considered but decided against because of aesthetic appeal.

Are lights high tech? Nope. Are lights a trending practice in the industry? Some will advise yes.

But most importantly, did the combination of lights and pleasingly aesthetic chokepoints solve the problem at the community?

Yes, it did solve the problem.  Two years running, and there have been no recurring incidences of theft.

Wireless access deployment

There is a current trend in the business community to provide free WiFi Internet access for customers.  You see it at McDonald’s, at Starbucks, at Home Depot, and at your local grocery store.  But why?

Will deploying WiFi cost money and impact your revenue?  You bet.  Your company will incur a capital expense in buying the equipment, as well as a recurring expense of both maintaining the equipment and the cost of the internet.  Then why do it?  Because it may impact your revenue in a positive way and keep your customers around.

Free coffee

Deploying WiFi is the modern way of providing free coffee to your customers.   It creates a hospitable environment for your customers, an environment that may appeal to them in a very homelike, friendly way.  Not everyone will be drinking the coffee, and not everyone will even care.  In the same way, most customers who have a WiFi enabled device are likely to already have data capabilities from their phone provider.  So why do it?  Because everyone will see the sign that says “Free Coffee”, and everyone will see the sign that says “Free Wireless Internet”.

The return on investment for “free guest WiFi access” is difficult to establish for a cost conscious executive.  Free anything is marketing.  It is just a way to reduce the “salesman vs customer” feelings, and create an environment where your customers are, well, at home.  It helps to keep them around.

 

 

Business Continuity and Resiliency Planning

what business continity plan
Business Continuity Planning? Yes, even you need it!

Are you responsible for business success?  Have you thought about what to do on those imperfect days?

The electricity goes out, your computer starts smoking, or one of your employees has an accident on the way to a very important delivery.

All of these are part of Business Continuity Planning (or BCP). The phrase BCP really took off after 9/11, along with Disaster Recovery Planning, but it has always been a part of a business plan, even if it is not written down.

In Business Continuity and Resiliency Planning, we attempt to put some order to the chaos. The paper is not a basic BCP tutorial, but instead is written just to get you to think about your business, what might happen to cause an interruption, and what you can do to lessen the opportunity for a disruption and lessen the impact of a disruption.

Happy reading! By the way, I’d love to hear your feedback!

 


 

Abstract for

Business Continuity, Resiliency, and Disaster Recovery Planing

Yay, you are in business! You’ve created your company, you have your occupational license, your office and storefront set up, vendors, product lines, and best of all, customers!

But are you ready to open? What happens when things go wrong? Let’s face it, adversity comes in many flavors. Sure, emergencies like a fire, and disasters like a hurricane are adverse, but there are more adversities to consider. A storm, or a crime, your internet goes down, or even something like if your suppliers stop supplying.

So what happens during these adverse conditions? What are your real risks, and how will you protect your business – and your customers – from the risks? Good resiliency planning will keep your business operating when things just don’t go right.

This paper helps you explore your exposure to risks and remedies for adversity. You don’t want to be in a position of trying to figure out what to do during a crisis. As some of us have heard through the years, prior planning prevents poor performance. Will this planning make you 100% safe from adverse conditions? Of course not. What it will do, though, is help you understand the risks your company faces, and help you get through the situations.

In this paper, we’ll focus on business continuity and resiliency planning as it relates to your product, to your business process, and to retaining your customers. We’ll look at snippets of what winds up being important to different kinds of businesses, including an Ice Cream Shop, a Home Health Agency, a roofing company, and a Restaurant. Although the content is appropriate for all businesses, the intended audience is the small business. We’ll avoid going through the purely educational process of defining Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery; instead, we’ll look at practical, real life examples of what you need to consider when it comes to protecting the interest of your company.

 

Chapter 1 Introduction to Business Continuity

When it comes to starting your business, there is no one “right type” of plan. There are business development plans, financial and budget plans, marketing plans, and recycling plans to name just a few. These are all great plans, and very important to any business. But let’s face it, some are more important than others.

And when it comes to protecting your business from adversity, there is truly no one “right type” of plan. These are the plans that you hope to never use, plans that are only important when things just go wrong. But equally so, these plans are important – to both your customers, and to your business interest. Take these examples,

  • What happens if your building burns to the ground? Are you going to set up shop at a temporary facility, or will you cancel all pending orders? How long will it take to recover? And how many pending orders will you lose? How will this affect your customers? To manage this risk, have you installed sprinkler systems? Or a fire alarm that automatically calls the fire department when things go wrong?
  • How about a hurricane warning? Do you send your workers home? How is your customer base affected by hurricane warnings? If you are selling water, you stay in business since everyone and their brother will be looking to buy water! But how about if you are an Ice Cream shop? Do you expect to get much business while everyone is scurrying around trying to board up their windows? How about if you are a licensed Home Health Agency? You may have government regulatory demands in place that force you to stay open, or maybe even force you to move all of your patients to a safe house for continued care.
  • How about a tsunami that happens quite quickly? You may say, “Oh, but I’m in Florida, we don’t have tsunamis.” This is true, you don’t. However, your suppliers may by affected, and if your suppliers are affected, you are affected. Take for example the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that affected Japanese LCD and semiconductor manufacturers, thereby disrupting the worldwide supply of these components.

Certainly, you may not know at this moment what you will do in these situations. It will likely depend on many factors, such as what is your business backlog of orders. However, it is never a bad idea to have a plan, and planning may even clear up some of these unknowns.

As a reminder, plans are just that, just plans. As Winston Churchill is quoted, “Plans are of little importance, but planning is essential.” Yeah, maybe. Then Mike Tyson tells us, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face.” What do we take away from all this? Have a plan, but don’t be a slave to it. Be comfortable in changing the plans as necessary. These types of plans are truly living documents. You already know your business. As you get to know more about risks, your risks plans will become more mature. In these first phases, you may or may not even document the plan – the goal is to understand your risks.

Let’s look at what we are trying to achieve here and set some expectations. This is not a Business Continuity Training document. It is intended to look at real life threats and impacts to your small business. When we think Business Continuity, we should be thinking about, “what are the threats and risks to my business when it comes to completing my mission.” That is, what adverse situations might happen that will negatively impact completing your business goals. In this document, we’ll be looking at ways to reduce the impact of those adverse situations. We will be examining real life scenarios for real life companies, including a retail ice cream shop, a home health agency, and a restaurant.

This paper will consist of the following sections. First, we will lay out objectives or principles of the risk plan that we are writing. Next, we will brainstorm business continuity threats and risk impacts to your business, taking note of all conceivable risks (some of these will be unreasonable, and we can eventually discard them as unreasonable). Then, we will outline how to document the business continuity risks and associated mitigation. Finally, we will detail some of the risks and mitigation steps required to successfully keep your business running. Along with this, we will outline how much it is going to cost to implement the risk mitigation. We’ll end with some concluding remarks and way forward for developing a more comprehensive business continuity plan.

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